Project Augustine

Home » Posts tagged 'Protestant'

Tag Archives: Protestant

Archives

Advertisements

UPDATE: “Confessions” Book VIII – Chapters 1 – 6

 

How pagan are modern-day church services today?  Have church services been pagan all along?

 

Here are our essays on Book VIII – Chapters 1 – 6 of Augustine’s Confessions.

We discussed the implications of delayed gratification, the pagan elements and origins of the Catholic Mass and Protestant services, the life of Anthony the Great and whether or not Christ calls us to a life of asceticism.

 

 

Advertisements

UPDATE: Chapter 20 Protestant Awakenings (1600 – 1800) – Part I: Protestants and American Colonization & The Fight for Protestant Survival (1600 – 1800)

 

William Penn, founder of Pennsylvania, (1644 - 1718)

William Penn, founder of Pennsylvania, (1644 – 1718)

 

We begin with the British colonization of eastern North America and the impact Protestantism had there.

 

Here are our essays concerning slavery, the Quakers, William Penn, and John Locke.

 

Also, Michael placed a late submission for Chapter 19 concerning the influence of pagan practices inherited from the Roman Empire into Christian traditions we often take for granted.  Many Christians are quick to dismiss the often categorized “pagan” aspects of other religious traditions such as voodoo, without realizing the blatant paganism inherent within Christian practices itself.  Before we quickly judge others, it’s best to know our history and where our beliefs and traditions originated from.

 

 

Chapter 20 – Protestant Awakenings (1600 – 1800): Part I

 

Puritans Land Near Salem

Puritans Land Near Salem, Mass.

 

For next Tuesday, July 15 please read the first two sections of Chapter 20: Protestant AwakeningsProtestants and American Colonization and The Fight for Protestant Survival (1600 – 1800).

 

Please write a one page summary on one of the following topics:

 

  1. How did early English settlers to North America use Protestant rhetoric to justify colonizing eastern North America in relation to Catholic settlers from Spain and France?
  2. Summarize how the Puritan and Reformed themes of covenant, community, and being in the “wilderness” formed early New England identity.  What were the theological aims of the Puritans?  Were they separatists?
  3. Describe how English Protestant evangelical aims were different than Catholic missionaries to the native Indians.  Include the efforts of Roger Williams and John Eliot to the Native American population.
  4. Describe the efforts of William Penn, the Quakers, the formation of the Pennsylvania colony, and their belief in the freedom of religion.
  5. Summarize the reign of King James II of England and the political turmoil he caused.  Who were the ‘Whigs’ and the ‘Tories’ and why were they important?  Describe his relationship with Prince Willem of Orange of the Netherlands and his campaign against Catholics.
  6.  How did John Locke appeal to the Bible to provide the basis for his philosophy of the social contract and raise doubts about a sacred monarchy?
  7. How did England become the major super-power of the world during this era in history?  What events contributed to the expansion of the English empire?  How did Britain make Protestantism to become the forefront of Christendom and Christianity?

 

Please submit by Monday, July 14.

 

 

 

Questions for Chapter 18: Rome’s Renewal (1500 – 1700)

 

File:Paul iii and ignatius loyola.jpg

Pope Paul III approves the Formula Instituti of Ignatius of Loyola (1539)

 

Please read all of Chapter 18 in MacCulloch’s book where it centers around the Counter-Reformation by the Catholic Church from 1500 – 1700.

 

We will meet this Sunday to go over our essays.

 

Please write a summary on one of the following:

 

  1. Discuss the origins, development, rise, and importance of the Society of Jesus (or Jesuits) from its beginnings with Ignatius Loyola.  What role did they play in the Counter-Reformation?  Discuss their accomplishments in secondary education throughout Europe.
  2. Discuss the central tenets of the Council of Trent in 1545 and through 1563.  Include issues laid out for Catholic catechism, liturgy, and issues about the authority of the Catholic Church.  What was its greatest impact or lasting legacy?
  3.  Discuss the impact and acceptance of the two mystics: Teresa of Avila and Juan de Yepes (John of the Cross).
  4. What were the events that led up to the Massacre of St. Bartholomew’s Day in 1572.  How were relations between French Catholics and Huguenots affected from this incident?
  5. Why did Poland-Lithuania embrace Catholicism after being “such a fertile seminary of Protestant experiment”?
  6. Discuss the differing ways Protestants and Catholics began implementing unique styles of worship and services.
  7. Discuss why Galileo was placed in prison for his scientific views.  What historical circumstances led to his verdict by the Catholic Church?
  8. Why did the persecution and hunting of witches happen during this time in Europe and North America?  Why did it eventually cease?

 

Please have your responses ready by this Saturday, June 14.

 

 

“Do Infants Go to Hell if They Die Before Baptism?: The Doctrine of Original Sin Re-examined” – an Orthodox Perspective

We will be covering the Orthodox Church very soon in MacCulloch’s book, so it’s good to get a glimpse of a bit of its theology and how it differs from the West, especially when it comes to the definition of “sin”.

http://www.pravmir.com/do-infants-go-to-hell-if-they-die-before-baptism-the-doctrine-of-original-sin-re-examined/

“It is not clear by what justice humanity can share in Adam’s guilt when it existed only in potentiality in his loins at the time of the Fall.  It is also difficult to see why the children of the baptized should inherit a guilt from which their parents have been cleansed.” – Prof. Gerald Bonner, Roman Catholic theologian

It’s good to bear in mind that Augustine never intended his theology of “Original Sin” to be a world-wide, eternal church doctrine – it was the Church many years later that adopted this idea and made it into a doctrine.  Later on, Protestantism adopted this as doctrine as well and has shaped Western theology ever since.

It’s amazing how a mis-reading of the Bible that led to a mis-interpretation that led to this doctrine.  This is why it’s always critical to have good exegesis precede hermeneutics.

Hello and Welcome to Project Augustine.

Welcome!

We hope you enjoy and learn from our new site where we discuss topics pertaining to the Christian faith including theology, christology (the nature of Christ), soteriology (salvation), church history, philosophy, biblical studies, science, and other fields.