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Chapter 17: Reformed Protestants and Reformation Crises (1560 – 1660)

 

File:Battle of Naseby.jpg

Battle of Naseby, by an unknown artist. The victory of the Parliamentarian New Model Army, under Sir Thomas Fairfax and Oliver Cromwell, over the Royalist army, commanded by Prince Rupert, at the Battle of Naseby (June 14, 1645) marked the decisive turning point in the English Civil War.

 

 

Next Sunday, June 1 we will finish Chapter 17 by discussing the final two sections: Reformed Protestants, Confessionalization and Toleration (1560 – 1660) and Reformation Crises: The Thirty Years War and Britain.

 

Please write on one of the following topics:

 

  1. Discuss how Reformed Christianity/Reformed Protestantism triggered revolutions throughout Europe, especially the Netherlands, Scotland, and France during the 1560s.  Why was this so?
  2. What was “confessionalization“?  How did this affect Catholicism in Europe?
  3. Discuss the open toleration of other forms of Christianity, like the Anti-Trinitarians (i.e. ‘Socians’), in places like Transylvania and Poland-Lithuania.
  4. Discuss the background of the events leading up to the conquest of the kingdom of Bohemia by the Habsburg dynasty.  How did Habsburg Emperor Ferdinand’s dismantling of Protestantism affect European politics and religion – especially between Protestants and Catholics?
  5. Discuss the theology of Dutch Reformed academic and theologian Jacob Arminius during the 1600’s.
  6. Discuss the importance and development of the King James Bible in 1611.
  7. Discuss how the policies of King Charles I and Archbishop of Canterbury Laud affected the Scottish and Irish churches.  What were the effects of the English Civil War in 1642?  How did the term “Anglican” arise from this time in English history?

 

Please submit your essays by Saturday, May 31.

 

 

 

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