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UPDATE: Chapter 22 – Part II – “God is Dead.”

 

 

It has been a long time coming, but here are our essays for the last half of Chapter 22, focusing on the rise of Christian fundamentalism, biblical criticism, the “quest for the historical Jesus”, and the philosophy of Friedrich Nietzsche.

 

It was good to get back in the swing of things after a little over a month and a half, and hopefully we’ll get the momentum back till we finish the book.

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UPDATE: Chapter 22: Europe Re-enchanted or Disenchanted? (1815 – 1914) – Part I – First-wave feminism, Ultramontanism, and Hegel

 

 

 

This past Wednesday we had a rather lively discussion on the notion of visions in Christianity – visions of Mary for Catholics and just general visions by Pentecostals or other generally charismatic sects.  It’s quite interesting that the Mother Mary almost never (to my knowledge) appears to Protestants – visions of Mary almost always occur to poor girls in small villages that are going through war or political strife.  For Protestants, claims of visions or other prophetic utterances seem to be hit or miss according to the limited experiences we discuss from our own personal encounters.

 

There was also some discussion on whether or not missions (in general throughout history) isn’t a form of Western imperialization in some respects.  We tend to go there and not only want to preach the gospel to them, but also hope and pray that they’ll receive the same benefits and even the comforts of an affluent Western lifestyle.  Has the Western mindset of the gospel been diluted and mixed with the gospel of Western standard of living and materialism?  There was also some thoughts as to whether or not Marcion was right in stating that the God of the Old Testament and the God of the New Testament are NOT one and the same.  Christianity has moved so far away from Judaism and its understanding of God that when you compare the two, they seem worlds apart.  It is arguable, but it’s an interesting thought nonetheless.

 

Here are our submissions from our meeting this Wednesday.

 

 

“Imagining Barth and Nietzsche in Conversation” by Daniel Migliore and the Third Ed. of “Faith Seeking Understanding: An Introduction to Christian Theology”

 

 

 

Friedrich Nietzsche (1844 - 1900)

Friedrich Nietzsche (1844 – 1900), German philosopher

Karl Barth (1886 - 1968)

Karl Barth (1886 – 1968), German theologian

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Just as Project Augustine celebrates its two-year anniversary this month, Eerdmans Publishing will have the 3rd Edition of Faith Seeking Understanding: An Introduction to Christian Theology out next month.

 

Project Augustine started off with going through all of the 2nd Edition of Daniel Migliore’s Faith Seeking Understanding which you will find here in July of 2012.

 

According to his article, Mr. Migliore will include a brand new section of an imaginary conversation between German philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche and German theologian Karl Barth.

 

From the article:

 

In my dialogue I try to avoid giving all the good lines to one of the speakers and reducing the other to a mere foil. My reason for doing so is that Nietzsche’s critique, even if dated, is in some respects devastating, and if I understand Barth’s way of doing theology aright, his response to the atheist challenge is not to try to defeat it by a clever apologetic strategy but instead simply to present as clearly as he can the Christian understanding of God centered in the person and work of Jesus Christ as attested in Scripture.

 

Our group took great joy going over Prof. Migliore’s book and we look forward to the new edition coming out next month.

 

Daniel Migliore

Daniel L. Migliore is Charles Hodge Professor Emeritus of Systematic Theology at Princeton Theological Seminary